Choosing A Supported Spindle Photos

Here are some photos that go with The Peahen’s Ponderings Episode 5, Choosing a Supported Spindle.

These five supported spindles — all Spanish Peacock beads and Ninja — are my go-to guys for spinning projects. It has taken me 8 years of supported spinning to “dial in” the length (and type) of supported spindles I prefer. All of these spindles are just over 11″ in length. Mind you, I did not realize how consistent they were in length until recording the podcast!

With experience, you learn what length and type of supported spindles work best for you
With experience, you learn what length and type of supported spindles work best for you

(The fiber is four ounces of faux cashmere — aka nylon — from Wild Hare Fiber Studio.)

Remember that the height of your bowl can change the length of spindle which is comfortable for you when supported spinning. The stemmed lap bowl on the right adds four inches in height!

Remember the lap bowl adds to the height of your supported spindle
Remember the bowl adds to the height of your supported spindle

This photo shows the difference between a Spanish Peacock Tibetan (right), bead (left), and Ninja (center) supported spindles. The Ninja is a hybrid between the Tibetan and bead, offering the best features of both. It gets speed from weight close to the shaft, and momentum from weight away from the shaft. It’s not too heavy, and not too light. It’s just right!

The family tree of the Ninja - the best features of a Tibetan and bead spindles
The family tree of the Ninja – the best features of a Tibetan and bead spindles

This photo shows various spindle lengths. From right to left: my ash Russian plying spindle at 14″; a recently adopted bead spindle (i.e., it had too much wobble to sell) at 11″; and a pocket Tibetan spindle at 9.5″.

Different lengths of supported spindle
Different lengths of supported spindle

Please leave a comment below if you still have questions or if there are additional photos you would find helpful from the Choosing a Supported Spindle episode of The Peahen’s Ponderings.

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4 comments

  1. […] Once lashed in place, the spoon sat just slightly lower than my waist. This is several inches above where my bowl normally rests, so I had to resort to spindles shorter than I typically use. I didn’t have any pocket bead spindles, but I dug up a pocket Tibetan from my collection for the experiment. This photo shows how much shorter a pocket Tibetan is compared to my preferred shaft length of 11.5 inches. […]

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